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Summons for examination

If tuberculosis has been diagnosed in someone in your vicinity, you will be summoned to undergo a tuberculosis examination. Tuberculosis is a contagious disease that can cause severe complaints and which does not disappear by itself. Infection occurs through coughing and sneezing.

The chance that you have the disease and are contagious for others is small. It is nevertheless important that you are examined. It is best to find out quickly if you have been infected, because it means you can get medicines that can prevent you from getting the disease.

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What happens during an examination?

What happens during an examination?

There are various ways in which the examination can be carried out. Which examination you receive will depend on, for instance, your age and whether you were inoculated against Tuberculosis.

  • Tuberculin skin test or Mantoux test.
    A tiny amount of fluid is injected into the skin of the left lower arm. After 2 to 3 days, a Public Health Service doctor's assistant assesses the reaction the fluid has caused in your skin.
  • X-ray examination
    A lung X-ray can show signs of infection that could indicate the early stage of tuberculosis.
  • Blood examination.
    Blood is taken to be examined in a laboratory for the presence of antibodies against tuberculosis.

Often a combination of tests are used in order to be absolutely sure about whether you are infected.

What do I need to bring along?

What do I need to bring along?

You should bring proof of your identity when you come to the Public Health Service for an examination. The Public Health Service is statutorily obliged to ask for it.

What happens to my data?

What happens to my data?

The Public Health Service enters your data into an electronic patient file. This is part of a national database that can also be accessed by other Public Health Services. In this way, the Public Health Service tuberculosis control team that is treating you can access data that another Public Health Service may have on you. This could be necessary if you have changed your address. Information in your file is subject to medical confidentiality.

Statutory rules apply when your details are passed on to a different Public Health Service. You can complete an objection form if you object to another Public Health Service accessing your file or to us passing your file on to a different Public Health Service. You will receive the form during your consultation; you can hand over the signed form to the Public Health Service tuberculosis control team and we will make your file invisible to other Public Health Services.