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PrEP

PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) is a tablet that can prevent an HIV infection. The tablet is intended for people who are HIV-negative, but have a bigger risk of being infected with HIV. For instance, men who have sex with other men (MSM) or transgenders who have had unprotected anal sex during the past 6 months.

Are you interested in PrEP?

We have a waiting list for PrEP due to extensive interest. Contact us for more information. If you take PrEP, you will need to see a doctor for regular check-ups. During these check-ups, you will undergo tests for renal function, HIV and other STDs.

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Questions and answers about PrEP

What does PrEP do exactly?

Each PrEP tablet contains two HIV-inhibitors, i.e., emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil. PrEP only protects against HIV, not against other STDs. PrEP is reliable if you take the tablet conscientiously and at the right moments.

How to take PrEP?

There are two ways to take PrEP: one tablet a day, or at moments when you have sex. The decision about which method suits you best depends on your sex life, and is made in consultation with the doctor.

For further background information, check the following factsheets published by the Aids Fund and Soa Aids Nederland [STD Aids the Netherlands]:

Did you forget to take a tablet?

If you take them on a daily basis:

  • If you forgot to take 1 tablet, the forgotten tablet can be taken up to 12 hours after the original moment for taking it. If more than 12 hours have passed since you should have taken it, forget this tablet and continue with the normal administration schedule. There is one exception to this: if you forget a tablet during the first week of the daily schedule and more than 12 hours have passed since the planned intake moment, you should contact the Public Health Service for advice.
  • If you have not taken a PrEP for 48 hours and you had unsafe sex during the past 72 hours, during office hours you should contact the Public Health Service for advice. Outside office hours, contact the GP out-of-hours surgery. You may need a course of PEP.
  • If you have not taken a PrEP for 48 hours and you had no sexual contact during the past 72 hours: start again by taking 2 tablets no more than 24 hours – and no less than 2 hours – before having sex. After this, take one tablet at a fixed moment every day and continue your daily schedule as before.

If you take tablets at moments when you have sex:

  • You are not protected if you forgot the first two tablets. We advise you to use a condom.
  • If you forgot to take a follow-up tablet after the high-risk moment: you can take the forgotten tablet within 12 hours after the moment at which it should have been taken. Do not delay your intake times.
  • • If you forgot to take the follow-up tablets and more than 12 hours have passed since the correct intake moment and you have had unsafe sexual contact: during office hours contact the Public Health Service for advice. Outside office hours, contact the GP out-of-hours surgery. You may need a course of PEP.
What should you do if you vomit or have diarrhoea?
  • If you vomit within 1 hour after taking the tablet, you should take another tablet.
  • If you have diarrhoea and you are thinking of having sexual contact, we advise you to use a condom. Diarrhoea makes the mucous membranes of your intestines more permeable for the HIV virus, and your body may absorb less PrEP.